Here is my guide and take out from short visit of Qutub Minar

06 October 2017, Places I explored Qutub Minar

On 14th September 2016, I made an unplanned visit to Qutub Minar. I went to Delhi for business meeting and got free from by work by afternoon. As my return journey to Ahemdabad was scheduled in evening and had enough time to roam around. Hence I’ve decided to visit one of tallest brick minaret of the world – Qutub Minar.

Here is my guide and take out from short visit of Qutub Minar.

If you are passionate about history then visiting Qutub Minar will be perfect treat for you. Qutub Minar is one of historical place to visit in Delhi, located in heart of Mahrauli. It stands testimony to the expertise of Indian architects of that era. Combined with the Islamic influence and sheer stature of the minar, it is identified as one of the defining symbols of India.

How to reach: Easiest way to reach to Qutub Minar is using Metro which is accessible from all major locations of Delhi and it is cheapest and quickest mode of transportation in Delhi. Nearest Metro station is Qutub Minar Station in yellow route. It is only a short walk from the station.

You can get Auto and Cab service like Uber or Ola to reach Qutub Minar. Local buses are available from various points in Delhi.

Entry Fee: There is an entry fee to visit. Charges for the same are very nominal. For Indian citizen, fee is Rs. 30 and for foreign visitors, it is Rs. 500. If you are carrying luggage, there is luggage storage room facility available to keep your luggage.

History: Qutab Minar is a soaring, 73 m-high tower of victory, built in 1193 by Qutab-ud-din Aibak immediately after the defeat of Delhi’s last Hindu kingdom. The tower has five distinct storeys, each marked by a projecting balcony and tapers from a 15 m diameter at the base to just 2.5 m at the top. The first three storeys are made of red sandstone, the fourth and fifth storeys are of marble and sandstone. At the foot of the tower is the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque, the first mosque to be built in India. An inscription over its eastern gate provocatively informs that it was built with material obtained from demolishing ’27 Hindu temples’.

You may know more about it from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qutb_Minar

Inside the Qutub Complex, there are many monuments to visit apart from Qutub Minar. Here is photos which are captured during my visit.

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